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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 21, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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ffififlfig west midlands, north ——... feeling chilly here. in the sunshine, a pleasa nt chilly here. in the sunshine, a pleasant day. i is 15 or 16. the other stories on bbc news: retail sales fall sharply, as the weak pound pushes prices up. research by the national crime agency suggests the average cyber criminal is someone in their teens. and the former aston villa and england defender ugo ehiogu has died suddenly at 44 after suffering a cardiac arrest. he died this morning. we are supposed to be concentrating
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on the final campaign day of the election, on sunday, turned to the attack on the was brought into custody, in thejury, but on the was brought into custody, in the jury, but was on the was brought into custody, in thejury, but was rallies have been cancelled today, and we these pictures show the final moments of the police had been deployed on this avenue, to they ended up the french media has named karim cheurfi and the victim
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has been named as a 47 europe. france is still piecing together the exact from what we understand, the attacker drove along the shore and stopped around we are hearing that the other two policeman that are injured are not ina policeman that are injured are not in a life—threatening situation any longer. france has been here before. the french certainly know how to respond. why does this country faced such a threat? i have been taking a look back. france is hardly alone in the struggle against home—grown islamic extremism. in recent years it has suffered a disproportionate number of attacks. in 2015, militants
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attacked the office of the satirical magazine charlie hebdo, killing 12. days later, gunmen stormed a jewish grocery store, killing another four. later that year, 130 were killed in the attacks on paris and the bata cla n the attacks on paris and the bataclan theatre. 0n bastille day lastjuly, a truck was driven through a crowd of people on the nice promenade. 86 people died. behind those terror incidents, they have had persistent low—level attacks, many aimed at the security forces. last yea r, attacks, many aimed at the security forces. last year, a police officer and his wife was stabbed to death in their home by a jihadis linked to so—called islamic state. weeks later, two terrorists attacked a church in normandy, killing eight 86—year—old priest. more recently, a policeman was stabbed and seriously injured ina policeman was stabbed and seriously injured in a suburb of paris, before the attacker appeared at an airport, where he was shot dead. translation: 0ver where he was shot dead. translation: over the past few months, the
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government has been calling on security forces to ensure the safety of citizens throughout the country. 0ver of citizens throughout the country. over the next few days, more than 50,000 police officers and military police will be deployed to guarantee the smooth running of the elections. since the attack on the bataclan, the state of emergency here in france has been extended five times. the police now carry weapons of duty for their own safety, and they have sweeping new powers to put suspects under house arrest. they can search apartments and computers without judicial warrant. but the list of people they are monitoring is enormous. 0ne mp who worked on the terror legislation told me there are 15,000 names on the list that documents the most dangerous. in marseille this week, police say they have foiled an imminent attack involving two men, and again, one of them was linked to belgium. in the rays that took place, they recovered a haul of semiautomatic weapons and bomb—making material. europe is
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awash with weapons. they have come in from the balkans and they are easy to source, cheap to buy. just to tell you that in the last few minutes, while you were watching the report, the interior ministry has confirmed the name of the policeman. he has been named as xavierjudge, an officer with seven years in the force. let's take you to a press conference. the far left candidate is in the final throes of his campaign. qualify for the second round. all of us must must recollect, and reflect about the future, the future of the country. for my part, surrendered by a lot of teams around me throughout the entire campaign, the interior
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and so on, reinforced by hundreds of thousands of intellectuals, workers, artisans and artists, who have demonstrated their willingness to support me, i would like to say that iam support me, i would like to say that i am ready to go into the second round and that is if that is the world of the french people. but each of you must be ready to take your own decisions, not out of animosity, hatred, but for the common good, the common good required. that is the fundamental sense behind the world republic, the common thing. everybody is responsible on sunday, all the citizens will vote as to
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what is good and bad for everybody. liberty, equality, and fraternity. think well and vote. we have just lost those pictures. but i think you got the message. he has been urging people to go out and vote, everybody just has been urging people to go out and vote, everybodyjust within a few percentage points off each other. it could make all the difference. we can bring in the runner of a political website. thank you for talking to us. as we have heard, just the danger that lasley‘s attack is going to have some impact on the boat. he has been urging people to
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go out and do their bit. who do you think benefits? the problem is that the race is so tight. just a few thousand votes could make a difference. today, we had the usual short, the law or candidates, trying to show that with them this would not have happened, this would have happened differently. that the government had not taken the correct decisions. le pen even said days ago that if she had been in power, the first of series of massive attacks paris and france have undergone would not have happened. i am paris and france have undergone would not have happened. lam not sure that this plays well with the public. people know that you do not have some magic answer to fighting terrorism, and governments have
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adapted. the state of emergency has been extended five times. and just days ago, two people arrested in marseille. and it takes a long time to get the security service, robust and resourced. it could take anything up to five years, having that intelligence service that is capable. in 2012, you had that attack just capable. in 2012, you had that attackjust weeks before the voting day, killing jewish kids in toulose. campaign was stopped but it could not change the outcome, because nicolas sarkozy lost the election to president hollande. this time, it is just days, and the race has been tighter than ever. it is not going to change the outcome of the election. having said that, i have
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talked to people and really, francoise had the luck of the draw, he was able to look at the news, and some have said that he looked presidential, the way that he was delivering that. he has experienced as the previous prime minister. he is definitely the one, playing on the experience of being prime minister. the others have no experience of security, but some key people do. in the third man in the race, fillon, needs that push to be in the last two. i think here's
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hoping that the security crisis, the fear, will push people, his voters, who have deserted him because of ethical and moral issues, to combat because he is the only one who has that experience. it is possible that at the last moment it could come back, not only the first three. and terrorism aside, it is a fascinating collection. thank you for talking to us. collection. thank you for talking to us. we were discussing in my report, this list with 15,000 names, the man who has been named as the attacker last night was not on that list. karim cheurfi. but he was known to police, and had been taken back into custody. you saw the police going through the property, trying to find out who he had been talking to,
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before the attack. and it would seem that extremists were trying to influence the vote. francois hollande, confirming that the election is going to go ahead, but i think we are going to be in for quite a few days of intense activity in france, as the police and security services surround the polling, trying as best as they can to prevent a repeat of what we saw last night. and there'll be live coverage of the results of the first round of voting in the french presidential election. that's this sunday at 6:30pm, in france decides on the bbc news channel. theresa may has confirmed that the united kingdom will continue to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid. speaking in berkshire, she said she was proud of britain's record of helping people. just how
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significant is this? is this what it says it is? that is the question, when you look at the language from the prime minister, and we will show you what she said in just one second,it you what she said in just one second, it seems absolutely categoric. but just a second, it seems absolutely categoric. butjust a little bit of a caveat, i will let you come to your ownjudgment. the a caveat, i will let you come to your own judgment. the context, a caveat, i will let you come to your ownjudgment. the context, an intense discussion that has been going on for the conservative party, over david cameron's idea of guaranteeing in law that the united kingdom would spend the 0.7% on foreign aid, and some critics thought it was perverse to say that down in law, because it set the department a certain amount of money that would rise when the economy was growing. and they would have to work out how to spend that money. they thought it was a strange way of budgeting, that is why it was a keen
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eye on theresa may, with the new conservative manifesto coming over the coming weeks, would stick with this. this is what she has said. the 0.7% commitment remains, and is going to remain. but what we need to do, look at how that money is going to be spent, and spend that in the most effective way. i am proud of the risk of that we have, about the children being educated as a result of what the british government and taxpayer has been doing, in terms of international aid, and the ability to help ebola, syrian refugees. i was atjordan, to help ebola, syrian refugees. i was at jordan, meeting to help ebola, syrian refugees. i was atjordan, meeting some youngsters who have been given good quality education. that is one of the things that the united kingdom is providing. we maintain that commitment but want to make sure that we're spending that money as
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effectively as possible. that "but". exactly. i have spoken to a senior conservative source, who knows about international development, to ask about that particular caveat. and without disappearing into the nerdiness of accounting practices, this boils down to the government saying, are they going to stick with the definition of what counts as international aid, and then determine what they think is the best use of that money? 0r trying to broaden the definition, some have suggested it could include security spending, from the foreign office. and if so, those who want to see some watering down could cheer it is not what it was. no commitment, no
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direct answer, sources have said just wait for the manifesto. and the question from our dignity political editor, about protection for pensioners. the triple lock. guaranteeing an increase in the state pension of 2.5%, from earnings and inflation, it was striking, given that the prime minister a nswered given that the prime minister answered that question on international aid,. that entirely. —— ducked that. international aid,. that entirely. -- ducked that. we will await the ma nifestos. -- ducked that. we will await the manifestos. thank you. we contained a look at the headlines. france's prime minister has urged the country not to allow yesterday's attack in paris to derail sunday's presidential election. 0ne police officer was shot dead before the gunman was killed. british retail sales figures have fallen sharply — as the weak pound and rising fuel costs push prices up.
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the prime minister theresa may has confirmed that the united kingdom will continue to spend 0.7% of the national budget on international aid, saying she was proud of helping those around the world. and in sport, tributes have been paid to the former aston villa and middlesbrough defender, ugo ehiogu who has passed away at the age of 44. who has passed away at the age of m. manchester united are going to face celta vigo in the semifinals of the europa league. and not county ladies have folded and withdrawn from the wsl. the club's debts were
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not cleared before the start of the season. not cleared before the start of the season. more at 2:30. votes are being counted in the election for the general secretary of unite — britain's biggest union. it emerged yesterday that gerard coyne, the main challenger to the current boss len mccluskey, has been suspended from his post as a regional official with the union. joining me now from the headquarters of unite in central london is our political correspondent leila nathoo. when will we get a result and do we know any more about gerard coyne's suspension? we are respecting to do something by the end of today, we're told the result would not be made public the end of next week but we now expect to get something about what is going on. the suspension of gerard coyne was the final twist, to become the leader of britain's biggest union, one of the biggest donors to the
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labour party, and it is so important because the battle for the leadership has been seen as a proxy contest. about the direction of the labour party. because len mccluskey, one ofjeremy corbyn's biggest backers. and the challenger, gerard coyne, the main rival, has been accused of meddling too much in westminster politics. it has been a dividing line drawn, and the suspension of gerard coyne, though it does not affect the contest itself, it was certainly a bolt out of the blue. but we expect to learn something later on today. we do not know why gerard coyne was suspended, but we know that we are going to get an investigation. we do not know the details of any allegations against him, what impact this could have if
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gerard coyne actually wins the contest. and has anybody been speaking about what is going on today? i am afraid not. we have had very little about what is going on. we know that the votes of the intended. that began at about ten o'clock this morning. and all the candidates in this race, all of them present at the count. we expect that to be wrapped up later this afternoon. we were not expecting to getan afternoon. we were not expecting to get an official announcement, until next week, but because of this surprise announcement and the interest in this context, we are hoping to get some sort of indication of the result later on this afternoon. we will be back with you if we do. german prosecutors have confirmed they have arrested a 28—year—old man suspected of bombing the borussia dortmund team bus last week.
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prosecutors say the man, who has german and russian nationality, was a financial markets trader hoping to make money if the price of shares in the team fell. 0ur correspondent, damien mcguinness is in berlin. initially, the thought was that this was going to be a terrorist attack, went to islamic state. that was one theory. we have a number of leads. and we had three separate crimes of responsibility, one from islamic state, right wing extremists, and another claiming responsibility on behalf of of left—wing extremists. but police have said all of that appears to be fraudulent, not genuine, and they have allegedly found the prosecutors believe is behind this attack. 28 years old. it seems that he wanted to make money
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from the stock markets, by getting put options. basically, betting on the share price of a company going up the share price of a company going up or down. the thought that the share price of the football team would go down drastically, it was cynical attempts, to make money. it has raised a lot of discussed in germany. people have been no. but also release that the person that prosecutors have said is behind this attack has been detained, and going to go behind judges, to see if there's going to be formally arrested, to see if we have got enough evidence to get him behind this attack. it is interesting that you have used the world relief. initially, islamic state, terrorism, the media speculated hugely about that. it was the narrative of terrorism. but it seems it was just
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somebody trying to make a quick buck. what does that say about the middle of the country, the media, and the threat that we all face? we have noticed the difference between her it has been looked at in germany, and outside of germany. the mainstream media were actually very cautious. the police said they were not ruling out any of these options. and from the outset, they said that they had votes, about this later claiming responsibility was genuine. at the same time, a lot of discussion online, and crimes from the antimicrobial dfd party, that it was definitely an islamist attack. that has been false. we saw, a lot ofjumping to that has been false. we saw, a lot of jumping to conclusions that has been false. we saw, a lot ofjumping to conclusions from the international media. he thought it was an islamist attack. in germany,
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it was different because we have had a number of incidents over the past few years, a number of incidents over the past few yea rs, i a number of incidents over the past few years, i went attacks, it has been thought it was islamist but it has not been the case. that has happened a couple of times. that is why the mainstream media have been cautious, and this afternoon the tea m cautious, and this afternoon the team itself has thanked officials and the media for notjumping to conclusions. that obviously makes it harder to get the actual perpetrator. and we can take a look at the weather. good afternoon. we have got a lot of dry weather this weekend, and sunshine, looking pretty good. today, you can look at the satellite picture. we have had a lot of great too, some sunshine at the south west. this cloud starting to thin, go lumpy. cloudy skies. the
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thickest, on that weather front, and behind that going to be introducing some called air, 1a, possibly 15. not much rain at all, especially if scotland. we could have some frost at the countryside. but those cloudy skies that wales, breaking things, and possibly some light showers. cooler here. otherwise, lovely. more sunshine to come, and a little bit more cloud for northern ireland, you could get some rain, but the worst is going to be coming next week. it is going to be coming next week. it is good to be getting much colder.
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hello. this is bbc news. paris mourns the death of a policeman who died in last night's shooting. the attack in the heart of the capital saw people fleeing the main boulevard — police shot the gunman dead. security is being reinforced ahead of sunday's presidential election. campaigning has been paused — although some of the main players have been giving their reaction to this latest attack. theresa may confirms that the uk will continue to spend 0.7% of national income on international aid. she said she was proud of the country's record of helping people around the world. uk retail sales post their biggest quarterly fall in seven years, as the prices of everyday goods continue to climb. sales in the first three months of the year fell across almost all types of shop.
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time for the sport. good afternoon. aston villa will hold a minute's applause before the game against birmingham city this weekend, following the death of former defender ugo ehiogu. he was a coach with the under 23s at tottenham hotspur and collapsed after a training session, having suffered cardiac arrest. before retiring as a player in 2009, the made of a 200 appearances for aston villa and spent seven years at middlesbrough, winning the league cup three times. here is steve bruce. being a fellow centre half, he was uncompromising, quick. all of the football world will be shocked and saddened. we just had a couple in there that are devastated to hear the news. i think all of us. in these moments, you
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think of his family and people around him. at 44, it is quite shocking news. a tragedy. it puts football into perspective. there have been a huge number of tributes paid on social media already. the former england and manchester united captain rio ferdinand says "i can't believe the news that ugo ehiogu has passed away. calm & warming vibe when in his company. my heart goes out to his family!" peter schmeichel also played at aston villa and said "i am shocked to hear that ugo ehiogu has died. football has lost one of its true gentlemen." ryan mason came through the tottenham under 23s — he said... and one of the current team, kyle walker—peters has underlined that, saying... and spurs have cancelled the under
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23 and all academy matches for this weekend as a mark of respect. manchester united will face the spanish side celta vigo in the semi—finals of the europa league. marcus rashford's late goal gave them victory over anderlecht last night. united will be away in the first leg on the fourth of may. in the other tie, ajax will play lyon. in the champions league draw, holders real madrid play city rivals atletico madrid and french side monaco take on italian giants juventus. the women's super league side notts county ladies has gone into liquidation after new owner alan hardy was unable to clear their debts. notts county reached the fa cup final in 2015 and they were due to start their season against arsenal on sunday, but they've now withdrawn from the league. great britain's james hall has won all—around bronze at the european gymnastics championships in romania.
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the 21—year—old finished behind gold medallist 0leg verniaiev of ukraine, and russia's arthur dalaloyan. another briton, joe fraser, was fifth. ellie downie and alice kinsella competes in the women's all—around finals in around an hours time. heather watson will play the world number 5 simona halep tomorrow, in the opening match of great britain's fed cup world group play—off in romania. victory in the tie would lift britain into the world group for the first time since 1993. johanna konta will then face irina—camelia begu in the second singles. there'll be commentary of watson's match on radio 5 live sports extra and both games will be shown on the bbc sport website at 8am. and ronnie 0'sullivan's match with shaun murphy is about to resume at the world snooker championships. two former champions of course, 0'sullivans leads 6—2, you can watch the action over on bbc two.
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that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. to give you some breaking news coming in on the reuters news agency, it is reported at least 17 schoolchildren have been killed in a car crash in south africa. this is in mpumalanga province. emergency services are at the scene. it is reported at least 17 schoolchildren have been killed in the car crash. let's return to the gun attack in paris last night. the policeman who has been killed has been named as xavierjugele. the gunmen has been named askarim
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cheurfi. meanwhile the french prime minister, bernard cazeneuve, has urged people in the country not to give into fear and intimidation, just two days until france votes in the first round of the presidential election. speaking earlier, he criticised the far right leader, marine le pen, who's currently one of the poll front runners. translation: of her translation: of her party has voted against all of the anti—terrorism laws. her party has voted against thejuly laws. her party has voted against the july 2017 intelligence services to prevent acts of terrorism. she forgets that her party has voted against all of the dispositions presented to the european council. she seems to deliberately oppose
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everything that has been done before, she opposes everything and has not given any serious or credible options. her proposal reveals her main objective. she wants to take advantage, to divide, she wants to exploit fear and emotion for political ends. now information allows us to link immigration and asylu m allows us to link immigration and asylum with what has happened in paris yesterday for the whole country. this attack was a tragedy.
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marine le pen is using this for a collection purpose. joining me from paris is a terrorism expert at the french department for international affairs. how much is the issue of security going to feature now, do you think, in the presidential elections? well, it is a paradox. in terms of terrorism and security, it was not the main topic in the presidential debate. so, it is returning to that. my first reaction would be to say that it should benefit those parties that were tougher, more firm on security, like marine le pen, which claims the
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border to be re—established again, or francois fillon, who denounced very strongly the islamic fundamentalism. so, giving a speech, like, i told you this was a main problem and you didn't take the necessary measures. this is a rare moment, after the big attacks in 2015, using the argument of national unity, we are at war with terror and we should stay united for democracy. it is very, very difficult to say that it will automatically benefit marine le pen. it is unpredictable.
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it does appear that the french security services did know of the gunmen. what effect is that likely to have? yes. the attacker yesterday on the champs elysees was well known by police services. he had a criminal record. he had been to jail for shooting on policeman years ago. he was spotted as a potential jihadist. a few months ago, he was arrested and was not kept in jail, he was not accused. so it is not the only case that two days ago the police arrested two people in
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marseille, who had automatic weapons, explosives, explosive belts. every time there is an attack of this kind in we discover that they were well known by the police service. they were suspected to be jihadists, orforeign service. they were suspected to be jihadists, or foreign fighters service. they were suspected to be jihadists, orforeign fighters going to fight in syria. i would say that the problem is a quantity one. the police services are not barred in france, but we probably have more than 2000 people radicalised, suspected to become jihadists or to go to syria. it is one of the main problems. isis is recruiting very
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efficiently in france and several french—speaking countries like belgium. we have to leave it there. many thanks for joining belgium. we have to leave it there. many thanks forjoining us. a student is appearing in court charged with supplying computer hacking programmes. he pleaded guilty to two computer misuse offences. angus crawford is following the case. what has the old bailey been told? the extraordinary case of a young man who is now 20. when he was 15, in his own bedroom, he created something called the titanium stressor. it was software he could sell to other hackers around the world, purely to carry out attacks on other websites, so—called ddos attacks, overwhelming
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computers with data, causing them to crash. we learned that it was responsible for 1.7 million attacks worldwide, 50,000 in the uk alone. it turned out that he had something like 112,000 customers to his website. he himself made more than £380,000 in dollars and bitcoins. we are going to leave it there for now. the latest retail sales figures show sales down by 1.4% in the three months to march, the biggest fall for seven years. what is going on? andy verity gave us more details. partly, you can answer that question by your everyday retail experience. we all go round the shops, we have the same feeling that we used to have, but didn't have for a while.
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that has gone up. it has gone up. food prices were falling for three yea rs. if food prices were falling for three years. if you look at what is happening to the average retail price, the consumer prices index is up price, the consumer prices index is up by price, the consumer prices index is up by 2.3%. i think we have a different index there. the average pay, up different index there. the average pay, up to 2.2%, is not keeping up with it. we have a renewed squeeze on living standards. we have that squeeze on living standards for four yea rs squeeze on living standards for four years from 2011 until 2015. then wages started outpacing prices. now we are back in the same situation. living standards are being squeezed. a large part of the reason is that prices are going up because most of what we buy comes from abroad. when the pound is weak, you need more of them to buy the same goods. that is in effect we particularly felt post—referendum. prison authorities in the us state of arkansas have carried out their first execution for more than a decade. the death, by lethal injection, of ledell lee, who was convicted of murder more than 20 years ago, is the first of several planned by the state before
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supplies of a drug expire. the go—ahead for the execution was given just 30 minutes before his death warrant ran out. richard galpin reports ledell lee had been on death row for almost a quarter of the century. he had been convicted of killing a woman with an iron bar. anything to say to the public? for years, he protested his innocence but last night the stay of execution was lifted minutes before his death warrant was due to expire. he was the first of four men due to be executed by lethal injection here in the coming days. i am not going to say i have come to terms with the state trying to take my life... the state of arkansas had originally wanted to put to death all of these eight men before the end of the month, an unprecedented
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rate of executions. and the reason for the rush is that is when the expiry date on supplies of this sedative used in the lethal injections runs out. all of this has brought protesters out onto the streets and action in the courts, with lawyers arguing the rush to execute amounted to cruel and unusual punishment. but the legal manoeuvres have only succeeded in halting four of the planned executions. the authorities in arkansas, though, insist what they are doing is right. there has been a lot of talk about the inmates. i would encourage you to remember the victims in this process and theirfamilies, who have had to go through this nightmare for 2a, 30 years. mary phillips was raped and strangled by one of the other men due to be executed soon. her husband cannot forgive her killer.
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i know a lot of people have forgiven him and all that kind of stuff. that's my business if i do it, so they can protest all they want, it don't matter. more executions are scheduled, even though the drugs have not worked in some other states, leaving condemned prisoners writhing in pain. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc news. france's prime minister has urged the country not to allow yesterday's attack in paris to derail sunday's presidential election. 0ne police officer was shot dead before the gunman was killed. british retail sales figures have fallen sharply — as the weak pound and rises fuel costs push prices up. theresa may confirms that the uk
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will continue to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid. how much do you spend online? the average uk household spent £11611 in 2015 — that's more per household than consumers in any other country. a report by the uk cards association says the average us household spent £3,500 using payment cards online and in australia it was £3100 — easy delivery is one of the factors driving up orders. tesla has issued a voluntary global recall for some of its model and model x cars to fix a problem with the parking brake. only about 2% of the 53,000 vehicles recalled are thought to be affected and the company say they've had no reports of accidents or injuries relating to the brake issue. in us trading, tesla shares closed down 1%.
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could sports direct break the states? the company has bought us sports clothing and outdoor equipment chains bob's stores and eastern mountain sports in a £79 million deal. it gives sports direct about 50 stores selling sports and casual wear and camping equipment — with an aim to grow their us online sales. donald trump has been making waves in two areas, trade and taxes. us president donald trump has launched an investigation into countries which export steel to the us — raising the prospect of new tariffs. china is the world's biggest steel producer. he has also said he will investigate
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the treasury on tax issues. michelle, let's talk about the first one. steele, is this the beginning of higher tariffs, trade wars? the president has ordered this review. this is going to be conducted by the commerce department. walter ross leads that, and he has been an outspoken critic of chinese steel. they have resurrected section 232 of the trade expansion act. it allows them, self—directed, without being asked to do it by us steel companies, to open an investigation and see if they are a threat or pose and see if they are a threat or pose a risk to national security. if they do, they can impose trade restrictions. we will have to wait to see the outcome of that review. president trump, when asked about this yesterday, tried to portray
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this yesterday, tried to portray this as a global problem, notjust a china specific problem. tax issues, tax is a big one. when you want to pour through big tax reforms, you have to go through congress, you can't do the whole thing by an executive order? you can't. we have seen the limits of some of the white house power, when it comes to health ca re house power, when it comes to health care reform. the sort of stalled effo rts care reform. the sort of stalled efforts there. with tax, you need to go through the legislative process. that being said, donald trump is on his way to the treasury department today and is expected to sign two executive orders. they are essentially direct the work of the treasury. so, he is ordering them to look at what they can do to reform taxation, what can be done with congress, but is there anything to do without congress? the other aspect of this is that they are two aspects of the financial law enacted after the crisis in 2008. this has
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to do with how the banks are dissolved in the event of a crisis. the idea of if they are systemically dangerous, if they are too big to fail or not. all of this, the treasury is good you look at and see whether or not it needs revising. this week, the imf‘s spring meetings in washington gave us clues about the global economic outlook. the imf‘s boss christine lagarde warned about protectionism and trade wars. of course the french economy is in the headlines as voters head to the polls at the weekend, but there are political headwinds around the world. here's what our economics correspondent, andrew walker, had to say earlier. the tone is a lot more positive than i have heard for several years, perhaps going back to the financial crisis. it wasn't long ago that christine lagarde, the imf managing director, coined the phrase the new mediocre. she was worried we were in
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for a period of protracted, sluggish performance with little prospect of much improvement in living standards. now, the tone has changed quite differently. the imf report earlier this week was called gaining momentum about the global economy. there was a question mark about that, i have to admit. but something has changed in the last six months or so. sales of barbie dolls have fallen for the second quarter in a row adding to a much worse—than—expected slump for mattel, the world's largest toy com pa ny. barbie, who has been on our shelves for almost 60 years had seen sales rise for the first nine months of 2016, following the launch of dolls in a range of skin tones and body shapes. lenders have intensified the mortgage price war with yorkshire building society putting a record low rate of 0.89% on the table — but the variable rate might not be as appealing as it
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sounds. it's not fixed so could go up and has an arrangement fee of almost £1500. lenders including sainsbury‘s bank, the post office and leeds building society are cutting borrowing costs to attract customers as property sales remain static. a us start—up selling a $400 wi—fi enabled juicer machine is offering a refund after its product was mocked online. juicero raised $120 million to launch last year. but the product was ridiculed by some after it emerged that the prepacked sachets could be squeezed just as easily by hand. juicero's ceo has defended the product — but says users who are not convinced can have their money back. a brief look at the market, not very exciting. all up here, and the oil price down a touch. it had its
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sharpest fall in a month earlier. we are seeing the oil price falling quite seriously. some very disturbing news coming to us some very disturbing news coming to us from south africa, where it appears 20 children have been killed ina road appears 20 children have been killed in a road accident outside the south african capital, pretoria. it happened in mpumalanga province. a p pa re ntly happened in mpumalanga province. apparently they were travelling in a school van when it crashed into a truck. eyewitnesses speak of an explosion into a ball of fire. we will bring you more on that as we gathered throughout the afternoon. let's look at the weather now. cold weather on the way this week, proper cold—weather next week. today, there has been some sunshine around. 0ver today, there has been some sunshine around. over the weekend, we will get some sunshine. for many of us it will be a dry weekend. this picture was taken in north somerset, where
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we have seen a decent sort of day. it has not been sunny everywhere. we have more cloud here in lancashire, for example. a hint of blue. that sums up the day for many parts of the country. there is cloudy sky, but also holes here and there. the best of the breaks in the cloud are across northern scotland. the air is colder, behind a band of the cloud, which is producing patchy light rain or drizzle. we end the day with some sunshine, probably across the south—west of england. some cloud across other areas of england and wales. the cloud tending to break up a little bit more as we head towards the evening, except for northern england where we see light rain or drizzle moving into northumberland. behind that, late sunshine in the central belt, but cold to end the day across central and northern scotland. the rain, such as it is, is going to slit southwards overnight. there will not be much rain at alland overnight. there will not be much rain at all and foremost it will remain dry. behind that, clearer
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skies coming in, particularly in scotland. a pinch of frost in the countryside. the cloud for many other areas, to the south and south—west in particular, it will be milder. here, the cloud will break up milder. here, the cloud will break up tomorrow morning, milder. here, the cloud will break up tomorrow morning, across milder. here, the cloud will break up tomorrow morning, across wales, across many western parts of england, we will see some good sunshine developing. more cloud across northern ireland, east of scotla nd across northern ireland, east of scotland and eastern england, where it will be cooler and one or two light showers. 0therwise, if you get the sunshine, it should feel pleasa ntly the sunshine, it should feel pleasantly warm. temperatures into the mid—teens. warmer in the afternoon if we get sunshine for the marathon. for most of it, ideal running weather, light wind, no rain to speak of. a chilly start. more cloud for northern ireland, western and northern scotland on sunday. a fine day and warm in the sunshine. high pressure in charge at the moment. low pressure will really strengthen the wins sunday night and into monday morning across scotland, gail is usually quite likely here.
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we are going to push down arctic air, northerly wind, sweeping right across the country on monday, into tuesday, possibly wednesday. almost anywhere could get a wintry showers. if you miss them, it will still feel cold, highs of eight or nine celsius. hello, you're watching bbc news. the french prime minister has stressed that he does not want yesterday's attacks to derail the elections on sunday. the government is fully mobilised so that nothing will stop this fundamental democratic moment for our country from going ahead. security is being reinforced ahead of the election and campaigning has been paused — although some of the main players have been giving their reaction to this latest attack. the other stories on bbc news: theresa may confirms the uk will continue to spend 0.7% of national income on foreign aid. what we need to do is look at how that money is spent and make sure we are able to spend that money
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in the most effective way.
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